Footnotes:

1. American Psychological Association Website: Answers to Your Questions About Sexual Orientation and Homosexuality.

2. Mike Lew, M.Ed., is a psychotherapist and group therapy leader, and is co-director of the Next Step Counseling and Training center in Newton Centre, Massachusetts. He provides public lectures, professional trainings and workshops for survivors of sexual abuse nationwide.

Another book dealing with childhood sexual abuse of boys that provides a more detailed profile and statistical breakdown of perpetrators is a book by Mic Hunter: Abused Boys: The Neglected Victims of Sexual Abuse. New York: Fawcett Columbine Books. 1990 pp.76-77.

3. Lew, Mike. Victims No Longer: Men Recovering From Incest and Other Sexual Child Abuse. New York: Harper Collins. 1988, pp.60-61.

4. This is a point brought up by Mel White in his book: Stranger at the Gate: To be Gay and Christian in America. New York: Plume books, 1994.

5. A diagram representing this concept, called Mammalian Brain Dimorphism is in included in the Appendix.

6. See, Bagemihl, Bruce. Biological Exuberance: Animal Homosexuality and Natural Diversity. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999

7. The word "homosexual" as we use it today was first coined in 1869 during the birth of the modern psychoanalysis movement. The original Hebrew and Greek of the bible have a handful of words for sexual acts, but no word for "homosexual." The word "homosexual" appears in some translations of the Bible that were published during the window of time (1900-1980s) of this century during which Medical Science considered Homosexuality to be a mental disorder. The original King James Version of the Bible, written before this time, and the New Revised Standard version, published afterward, do not use the word "homosexual."

8. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

9. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

10. See John J. McNeill, The Church and the Homosexual. 3rd. Ed. Boston: Beacon Press, 1988, p.59.

11. McNeill, p58

12. See Frazer, James George. The Golden Bough. Chapter 11 of the online version presents "Sexuality and Vegetation," in which Frazer discusses many of the practices that fertility religions have used in different cultures.

13. According to Frazer, in some South American cultures, couples are asked to have sex in their fields literally on top of the places where the seeds have been planted, on the very night that seeds were planted. So proximity in time and place to the planting was probably very important for the Canaanites as well.

14. A complete discussion of these commentaries and their influence on traditional beliefs can be found in John J. McNeill. The Church and the Homosexual. Boston: Beacon Press, 1976. p. 67-88.

15. The Open Bible: New American Standard Bible Translation. La Habra, California: The Lockman Foundation, 1977, p.1207. Specifically The book of Jude contains citations from the Books of Enoch and The Assumption of Moses, two apocryphal books.

16. Boswell, John. Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe. Villard Books: 1994.

17. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

19. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

20. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

21. Take for example the stories of Gideon in Judges Chapter 6 and Manoah in Judges Chapter 13.

22. Larry Switzer makes the same point as I do in his book Pastoral Care.

23. American Psychological Association Website: Answers to Your Questions About Sexual Orientation and Homosexuality.

24. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

25. One particular quote from writings of the time says that some people became "mad after man" in imitation of their Gods. Some deities in the Greco-Roman Pantheon behaved like the pederasts of the time (e.g. Zeus, with Ganymede). The Greeks and Romans modeled the relationships between their Gods after human relationships. This comes from the Apology of Aristides (see note 29 from Chapter 2 of McNeill).

26. See Scroggs, Robin. The New Testament and Homosexuality. Philadelphia: Fortress press, 1983. Robin has taught at both Union Theological Seminary and Chicago Theological Seminary. He is Methodist by background.

27. Remember that in Roman times, mush learning and writing was done in Greek.

28. See Bibliography. Larry K. Switzer is Emeritus Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling, Perkins School of theology, Southern Methodist University.

29. Larry K. Switzer. Pastoral Care, p.51

30. Switzer, p.54

31. Switzer, p.54

32. Switzer, p.54 I cite heavily from Switzer's work here because he has done a remarkable job of explaining these contextual issues.

33. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved

34. Excerpted from Compton's Interactive Bible NIV. Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 SoftKey Multimedia Inc. All Rights Reserved.